Cities are not located outside the natural environment. Buildings, industry and urban infrastructure consume resources, change landscapes and discharge pollutants into air and waters. Forests, waterfronts and waterways within city limits serve as ecosystems and habitat corridors on which species depend. Where we site factories, freeways, and parkland impacts the health of urban residents and defines the character of urban neighborhoods.

The Center on Urban Environmental Law (CUEL) at Golden Gate University School of Law takes the city as a natural starting point to assess how the law shapes environmental conditions.

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Submissions from 2014

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CUEL Comments on December 2013 Draft EIR/EIS for Proposed Bay Delta Conservation Plan (BDCP), Paul Stanton Kibel

Submissions from 2013

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Ninth Circuit Upholds Cal. Low Carbon Fuel Standard, Alan Ramo and Tim O’Connor

Submissions from 2011

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PROCEEDINGS OF THE 2011 CALIFORNIA WATER LAW SYMPOSIUM (WLS). THE END OF PAPER WATER: NATURAL LIMITS, UNLIMITED DEMANDS AND RELIABLE SUPPLY, Paul S. Kibel, Anthony Austin, Melosa Granda, and Luthien L. Niland

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Center on Urban Environmental Law (CUEL) Brochure, Alan Ramo

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Flight Park at Alameda Point, Alan Ramo

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New Center on Urban Environmental Law: Greening Bay Area Cities, Garrett Wheeler